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Paternity Tests and Infidelity: Is it Happening Behind your Back?

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It’s a sackable offence, no doubt, but it’s hard not to sympathise with the lab technician who in between the paternity tests, decided to check out her husband’s underwear to find out if her suspicions of him having an affair were true.

DNA Samples From Underwear

Like a kid in a sweet shop, it must be incredibly tempting to slip the DNA test in between other jobs to find out the truth about a philandering hubby. The woman in question was a forensic scientist for the Michigan State Police force in America. Her job involves DNA testing such as paternity DNA tests and other routine DNA tests. But she was fired after it was alleged that she abused state resources by doing the DNA tests on her unsuspecting ex-husband.

Abuse of Lab Resources

An investigation that lasted two months was launched into the woman’s abuse of the lab resources. It turns out that her motivation to sneak the test in between the routine paternity tests was because she thought the DNA results would help her divorce proceedings. In her defence, she said the chemicals she used for the tests wouldn’t have been missed or needed in DNA profiling as they were outdated and no longer of use in her job.

Ran Paternity Tests for Friend

Despite this, it was felt that her misuse of her position was enough to justify her losing her job. It turned out that as well as running DNA tests on her husband’s underwear, she also ran paternity tests for a friend. Unfortunately, as well as losing her job she found out that there was another woman’s DNA on her ex-husbands underwear.

Misuse of Power

The woman however was not prosecuted for her actions. The attorney for her ex-husband said the misuse of her position called into question her integrity. Although it’s possible to sympathise with the woman who wanted to find out about her husband’s affair, using the state’s resources to conduct paternity tests for friends was a clear misuse of her position.

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