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Whether you’re considering paternity tests for peace-of-mind or you’ve been ordered to take a test as part of a legal process, you may want some additional help and support. Paternity tests may not take long to do, but can be the source of a lot of distress and anxiety. You may get support from friends and family, but you could also find it useful to talk to a professional.

Paternity Tests – Legal Advice

Whether you are contesting paternity as part of a divorce settlement, or you are bound by the court to have paternity tests, you may want some legal advice. You may want to find an experience solicitor who can represent you, or you might just want to find out what your rights are in your case. The Law Society has a list of practising law firms, and you should be able to find a local firm that can help with your case. On the other hand, you may want to contact a voluntary organisation such as the Citizens Advice Bureau, which can help you to understand the process and give you additional contact details.

Emotional and Peer Support

One of the most important things to remember when you’re taking a legal or home paternity test is that you’re not the only one. It may seem like cold comfort at the time, but it may help to get in touch with other people who are going through the same experience as you. Not only will you find a sympathetic ear, but you may also unearth useful information that helps you approach the test in the best way and protect your rights as a father. Groups like Dads UK, Fathers for Justice and the Gingerbread group can all offer emotional help and support, as can independent counsellors.

Paternity tests are a hard thing to approach on your own. You can reduce the stress of the whole process by getting some support – which is why we’ve listed a number of government, voluntary and other support sources that could help you.

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