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Boston Terrier

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The Boston Terrier is a devoted and sensitive breed. Though they were originally bred to be a “pit-fighter”, the Boston Terrier is definitely a lover, not a fighter – earning the nickname the “little American Gentleman”. They have an affectionate, lively nature that makes them extremely lovable.

BostonTerrier_hero_-_CopyThough loveable, the Boston Terrier can be stubborn and independent. This makes persistent and consistent training a must. They are known for their extreme intelligence but they are very sensitive to the tone of the owners’ voice which makes them clever and quick learners.  They also tend to have bouts of hyperactivity. They do, however, love people of all ages. Their spunky attitude makes them amusing to everyone they meet.

This playful and saucy dog can sometimes get aggressive with unknown dogs. Though they are typically quiet and not prone to barking or aggressions, males can sometimes be wary of other dogs if they feel their territory is invaded.

Major Health Concerns: The Boston Terrier is a relatively healthy breed but occasionally is affected by cataracts, heart murmurs and joint problems.

Interesting Fact: Although a small breed, the Boston Terrier is a member of the Molloser group of dogs which traditionally include heavier built dogs such as Mastiffs and Bully-breeds.

Read up on other dog breeds and our tests

Please click here to find out more about our DNA My Dog Breed Test.

We also offer the Mars Wisdom Panel test which may include breeds not covered by the DNA My Dog test. Please click here for more information about the Mars Wisdom Panel 2.0 Dog Breed Identification Test

Australian Sheperd – An excellent companion, the Australian Shepherd is easy going and loves to play. They always remain puppies at heart.

The English Setter is renown for its jumping so if you are planning on keeping this dog in your garden build the fences high! They are also a very vocal breed and barking can be an issue, so try to combat this in their early years.

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